Troon making waves to become a BID Town

Troon Community Council have thrown their weight behind the Troon Business Association’s hopes to make the town a BID town.

The move if successful will see Troon become a Business Improvement District in a plan to bring more funding to the town for local events organised by local businesses.

The ambitious plan which was revealed at the meeting by David Grant, chair of the TBA and owner of The Jar on Ayr Street.

David revealed a consultation with the BID Scotland would cost £35,000 however, over five years it could be extremely beneficial for Troon bringing in excess of £200,000 to the area.

According to their website, BID Scotland have 40 towns involved in the scheme.

They also claim BID’s have generated £34million of investment for local economies and communities, with almost half of it coming from leveraged outside investment. They claim that the creation of BIDs have directly or indirectly created over 270 jobs.

Troon would like to join Giffnock and Largs as other local BID Scotland towns. Donna Read of the TBA admitted it would be a great idea.

She said: “I have a store in Giffnock, when you become a BID town, all businesses contribute to a levy fund which is incredibly helpful.”

It has been reported that the BID levy is tied to non-domestic rates. However, BID Scotland confirmed to us that the levy is not related to non-domestic rates and is not an additional charge.
The levy is ring-fenced for use by the BID’s Board of Directors and the council has no access to it.

David also advised the Community Council that Largs uses the fact they are BID town to help run their food festival which is a big hit with the locals.

 

He asked chair of the meeting Helen Duff and deputy chair Dougie Graham for consent in a letter of support from the Community Council to Bid Scotland which they both agreed on.

Helen Duff said: “This is a good idea, keep us updated.”

David revealed that any inroads would be taken in mid-late January 2017 to make Troon a BID Scotland town.

 

Source: Carrick Herald and Ayr Advertiser